Core Strategy Preferred Policies

[estimated] Ended on the 1 February 2010
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10. Sustainable Economic Development

Employment

10.1 The economy of East Hampshire is reasonably strong. The istrict has experienced low unemployment levels for a number of years (although this is now rising with the recession), whilst new business growth has been on a par with the regional average.

10.2 However, in broad terms there is a between the types of jobs available in the istrictand the resident workforcemore highly qualifiedprofessional. This leads to relatively commuting levels. The resident workforce seeks higher quality jobs outside the istrict, whilst the jobs available in the district are filled by workers from .

10.3 The way companies and businesses are evolving is also impacting on the region, for example the reduction in the manufacturing sector.

10.4 East Hampshire may well become more attractive as an employment location once road links are improved with the opening of the Hindhead Tunnel on the A3.The designation of part of the district as a national park could also be a boost.

10.5 The challenge, therefore, is to seek to provide for both the employment needs of the residents and businesses of East Hampshire and, at the same time, try to minimise the impact on the environment including the need to adapt to climate change.

10.6 In the context of this topic area, employment is considered to consist mainly of those sectors covered by the use classes, B1 (business), B2 (general industrial) and B8 (storage and distribution).

CP31 PREFERRED EMPLOYMENT LAND POLICY

Employment land

The Council’s preferred approach is to protect and enhance existing employment land where appropriate. Priority will be given to:

  • Safeguarding, and/or encouraging the re-use of, existing employment sites that are well located and otherwise well suited to employment use;
  • Considering alternative uses on employment land outside of the main industrial areas only where justified; and
  • Making provision for employment floorspace as set out in the Spatial Strategy.

Workforce skills

The Council’s preferred approach is to:

  • work with the relevant stakeholders (Education Authority, local colleges, business organisations and businesses) to assist in the provision of the relevant training facilities to improve workforce skills; and
  • ensure that on relevant development proposals planning obligations will be sought toward the enhancement of workforce skills.

Policy conformity

PPGs/PPSs/Circulars PPS1, PPG4
Draft South East Plan Policies RE1, RE2, RE3, RE4, RE5
Sustainable Community Strategy The local economy
Priority outcomes:
1. Encourage business to stay and invest in the district by:
  • Improving the infrastructure and local services for businesses and their employees living in the district.
  • Increasing the availability and choice of modern business premises.
2. Encourage the growth of new businesses to replace those in decline, such as agriculture, manufacturing, defence and lower value financial/business services activities.
3. Build high quality successful communities for the benefit of businesses, residents, workers and visitors in:
  1. Whitehill and Bordon - taking advantage of the MOD pulling out (see Area Priorities below):
    • Manage the potential down-turn up to 2011, as the population declines.
    • Maximise the up-turn from 2011 onwards as the population grows.
    • Ensure the Green Town Vision to develop the town is achieved.
  2. Small rural towns, ie Petersfield, Alton and Horndean.
  3. Smaller villages - increase support for rural village businesses and community services to stem their decline.
4. Reduce the number of people commuting to work outside the district by:
  • Increasing the level of skills in the local work force.
  • Increasing investment by companies that provide higher paid jobs in the area.
  • Increase number of qualified people and provide routes into work - especially for young people, women and disadvantaged (eg through more placement opportunities).
5. Tackle the issues associated with an ageing population which can lead to lower economic activity (such as more people wishing to work part-time and a slowing of small-business creation as their current owners retire).
Core Strategy Objective To maintain a buoyant local economy, whilst respecting the environment and the quality of life in East Hampshire.
To help provide jobs in East Hampshire for its residents.
Policy Indicator BD1 Total amount of additional employment floorspace- by type
BD2 total amount of employment floorspace on previously developed land – by type.
BD3 Employment land available- by type
Local Indicator - unemployment rate
Local Indicator - industrial/business land lost.
Local Indicator amount of land developed for employment, by type, which is in development areas defined in the Local Plan.
Delivery Bodies EHDC, development industry, SEEDA, Education Authority, local colleges, business organisations and businesses

Background evidence

Existing employment sites

10.7 The Council commissioned an assessment study of employment needs and floorspace requirements for East Hampshire to provide the Council with the evidence it needs in planning for employment land use.

10.8 The district employment needs study identified little requirement for additional floorspace up to 2026. The conclusion from these forecasts was that the Council can afford to release unviable industrial and warehousing sites and even, potentially, office sites.

10.9 The study also included a survey of employment sites and concluded that some loss of poorer quality sites should be considered to reflect the forecast decline in demand for this type of site. It noted that the poorest sites are largely rural, particularly those involving the conversion of rural buildings. However, they are no more sustainable for housing use than employment use because of their remoteness.

10.10 The study concluded that there was no need to release the well located and better quality sites. It stated that rather than releasing sites within recognised industrial clusters they should be recognised and supported, particularly the two main industrial areas based around, Mill Road, Alton and Bedford Road, Petersfield. In addition there was a need for a reasonable geographical spread of employment sites so that local needs can be met.

10.11 It is considered important, therefore, that the protection of existing employment sites that are well located and otherwise well suited to employment use is maintained. It is accepted that the loss of some sites, which are of poorer quality or poorly located may be necessary. However, alternative uses on employment land should only be considered where justified.

10.12 The study forecast that there was a limited requirement to provide additional floorspace, and identified many of the existing employment sites were becoming less useable. In view of these findings, it is considered important that existing sites are renovated or redeveloped for employment use to ensure an adequate supply of modern business premises are available.

10.13 It is considered the Council should pursue a policy which builds on strengths of the main employment centres (Alton – manufacturing, Petersfield – offices/business use). However, land use should not be rigidly linked to such a strategy, a wider base of employment types adds strength to a local economy.

Provision of employment land

10.14 The provision of new employment land is dealt with under the patial trategy section.

Workforce skills

10.15 The sustainable community strategy identifies the need to increase the level of skills in the local work force. The South East Plan Policy RE4 highlights the importance of a skilled workforce. It states that "a highly skilled, flexible and adaptable labour force is the foundation of future competitiveness, productivity and prosperity of the UK and the South East."

10.16 Skill levels are also an important factor if productivity is to be raised without undue impact on sustainability. This is recognised in the South East Plan in the text to Policy RE5, which identifies ‘skills’ as one of the six drivers of productivity.

10.17 The supporting text to Policy RE4 states that "planning agreements should be used to secure funding for training measures where appropriate."

10.18 Further work is being carried out, including a skills audit of the district, which will help to identify key issues in respect of workforce skills.

The Core Strategy ssues and Options consultation revealed:

10.19 Meetings with the business community identified the need for employment sites, although the employment floorspace study did not identify any overall requirement. There was considered to be a need for high quality sites and for high quality business park development, particularly in Alton and Petersfield. There was also support for the upgrading of existing industrial areas and buildings. The provision of infrastructure and other facilities to support commerce in the district was also identified as an important requirement.

10.20 The points made above by the business community were generally reflected by the type of comment made at the ommunity orums.

10.21 The Core Strategy ssues and Options consultation questionnaire indicated that the majority of respondents, 71%, agree that existing employment land should be protected from redevelopment for other uses. Of those respondents, over half 53%, support the encouragement of the regeneration of outdated sites to make them attractive to new business, 36% by only allowing employment land to be re-used after it has passed a series of tests, and 11% by protecting certain existing employment areas.

Options considered

10.22 The study forecast that for industry and warehousing there would be too much floorspace. It also included a survey of employment sites from which it concluded that some loss of poorer sites should be considered to reflect the forecast decline in demand for this type of site.

10.23 In view of these conclusions the following options were considered:

  • whether all employment land should be protected or whether in certain cases it could be released
  • whether there were preferred locations for the loss of employment land (e.g. rural urban or specific site identification)

10.24 The controlled loss of employment land - usually poor quality or poorly located - is already taking place in the district. Planning policy guidance would indicate that employment sites that are not required should be considered for alternative use. The controlled loss of some employment land would, therefore, be appropriate.

10.25 If employment land is to be lost, it raises the question as to whether there are preferred locations for this loss.

10.26 The report noted that the best or average sites are those in towns, particularly Petersfield and Alton. The poorest sites are largely rural, particularly those involving the conversion of rural buildings.

10.27 The study considered this matter and argued that it would be preferable to lose poorer sites in rural locations. However, rural sites are more remote and no more sustainable for housing use than for employment use. It concluded that town sites are more suited to sustainable alternative uses, but even here poor employment sites in some cases might have little alternative redevelopment potential, whereas better employment sites may have more alternative development potential.

10.28 Due to the large number of industrial and business sites it is not considered practical to identify individual sites throughout the district for retention or release. In addition, the circumstances of each site can change rapidly.

10.29 It is considered, therefore, that there are no identifiable and preferred locations for the loss of employment land. The protection of existing well-located and well-suited employment sites should be maintained, whilst the loss of some sites, which are of poorer quality or poorly located may be necessary, where justified. A criteria-based policy is the preferred option for determining those sites which could be lost.

10.30 The employment needs study suggested two strategy approaches based on the understanding that the District has no strong identity as an employment location, and therefore could:

  • Build on strengths of main employment centres, or
  • Relate main employment centres/sub areas to their wider sub-regional locations

It was considered more logical to build on existing strengths as the District was not that closely linked to wider sub-region in terms of existing uses (the position could be different for Whitehill/Bordon where major development is proposed).

Rural enterprise

10.31 East Hampshire is a predominantly rural district. Agriculture has played and continues to play an important role in the life of the area, although it is a sector which is in decline. Rural villages have also been losing facilities and businesses, such as local shops and post offices.

10.32 The challenge is to ensure that rural enterprise can prosper without adverse impact on the countryside.

CP32 PREFERRED RURAL ENTERPRISE POLICY

The preferred approach is to maintain and enhance rural enterprises subject to them being consistent in their scale and environmental impact with their location. Priority will be given to:

  • Promoting understanding by the local community of the needs of rural enterprise;
  • Working with others to promote rural enterprise, in particular that associated with agriculture, horticulture and forestry;
  • Retaining and enhancing existing services and facilities (e.g. shops, pubs and other small businesses);
  • Enabling residential development essential to maintain a rural workforce, including agricultural workers dwellings and rural affordable housing;
  • Enabling farm diversification schemes where appropriate, including:
    • Local food processing
    • Countryside pursuits (e.g. fishing and shooting)
    • Farmshops
    • Tourism facilities
    • Equine enterprises
    • Green technologies;
  • Enabling the conversion of rural buildings for appropriate uses, including:
    • Commercial use
    • Tourism facilities and accommodation
    • Community use
    • Residential use where appropriate and where assessment shows that the use for the above purposes is not possible or is unsuited;
  • Enabling the extension of existing firms in the countryside and small scale employment uses within the settlement policy boundaries of rural settlements, where justified; and
  • Supporting equine enterprises where appropriate.
Policy conformity
PPGs/PPSs/Circulars PPS1, PPG4, PPS7, Draft PPS4.
Draft South East Plan Policies RE1, RE2, RE3, RE4, RE5
Sustainable Community Strategy 4.1 The local economy
Priority outcomes:
1. Encourage business to stay and invest in the district by:
  • Improving the infrastructure and local services for businesses and their employees living in the district.
  • Increasing the availability and choice of modern business premises.
2. Encourage the growth of new businesses to replace those in decline, such as agriculture, manufacturing, defence and lower value financial/business services activities.
3. Build high quality successful communities for the benefit of businesses, residents, workers and visitors in: …..
  1. Smaller villages - support for rural village businesses and community services to stem their decline.
3.3 Social justice
Priority outcomes:
3. Aim to reverse the increase in rural isolation. For example, by increasing the provision of services in local rural communities
5.4 transport and access
Priority outcomes:
3.Tackle rural isolation by, for example:
  • Increasing the provision of community transport
  • Providing more services locally
Council Strategy 1. Intensify our protection of the built and natural environment.
  • Using planning more effectively to promote our quality of life
2. Safer and more vibrant communities
  • Developing better facilities in our towns and villages
3. Improve our focus on special community groups
  • Provide more affordable homes
Core Strategy Objective To maintain a buoyant local economy, whilst respecting the environment and the quality of life in East Hampshire.
To help provide jobs in East Hampshire for its residents.
Policy Indicator Local Indicator - amount of new business/industrial floorspace in the rural areas
Delivery Bodies EHDC, development industry, rural businesses.

Background evidence

10.33 Draft PPS4 recognises that rural areas have an important contribution to make to the regional and national economy. It goes on to say that "roper planning for economic development of an appropriate scale in rural areas can ensure that communities can prosper and thrive whilst ensuring continued protection for the countryside. Subject to the need to ensure robust protection of the countryside, in principle, all types of business and enterprise can be appropriate for rural areas."

10.34 The draft PPS has taken on board recommendations from the 2008 Taylor Review of Rural Economy and Affordable Housing.

10.35 With changes in agricultural policy, farmers are increasingly looking to diversify into other activities than purely agriculture. Examples of diversification include the processing of farm produce, farmshops and tourist accommodation.

10.36 Proposals for farm diversification and other rural enterprises are tending to become more contentious as the numbers of workers involved in agriculture and other traditional rural enterprises become fewer and as the rural settlements become more ‘urbanised’. This is in many cases due to a lack of understanding of the needs of rural enterprise and the council should counter this by promoting a greater awareness of the needs of farming and rural enterprise.

10.37 The district employment floorspace needs study saw little merit in permitting further employment use in isolated farm buildings when there is a surplus of industrial stock elsewhere. It suggested a strengthening of existing policy on rural building conversions where proposals demonstrate they meet well defined local needs and are ‘appropriately located’ as defined in PPS7.

10.38 However, the conversion of rural buildings to alternative uses can assist in farm diversification and encourage more rural employment opportunities. A policy which is too restrictive would not allow proposals to be considered on their merits and may curb well-intended enterprise.

10.39 The study also identified little requirement for additional employment floorspace. It is not considered necessary therefore to allocate additional land for employment development in rural areas. This is further supported by the fact that a substantial proportion of new land which comes forward in the rural areas results from the conversion of rural buildings.

10.40 A totally restrictive policy approach toward employment uses, however, could damage the opportunities for the rural economy.

10.41 The lack of affordable housing in rural areas is a concern to the Council. The affordable housing policies elsewhere in the Core Strategy are intended to help this situation. It will also be necessary to consider the specific needs of agricultural workers. The preferred option addresses this issue and more detailed policy advice will be included in subsequent development documents.

10.42 The preferred policy sets out the overall strategy which the Council wishes to adopt. Further work is likely to be carried out on the issues arising from the provision of employment floorspace in rural areas and the results will be used to prepare more detailed policies for inclusion in development documents to follow.

The Core Strategy Issues and Options consultation revealed: 

10.43 There were more responses to the advantages of allowing conversion of rural buildings to employment than disadvantages.

10.44 Advantages included:

  • Provides jobs and local employment
  • Provides lowcost accommodation
  • Helps rural communities
  • Preserves and re-uses existing buildings
  • Provides income to farmer

10.45  Disadvantages included:

  • Adverse impact on amenity/character of the area/countryside
  • Increase in traffic on rural roads
  • Increase in travel

10.46 A farming workshop was held where a number of issues were raised. One of the main issues of concern was the implications for farming of the designation of the national park. Many of the other issues raised were of a detailed nature and will be addressed through subsequent documents. The key issues for the Core Strategy were:

  • The non-farming community do not understand the needs of farming yet often object to diversification or other proposals;
  • Accessibility and highway issues are often used against diversification proposals, particularly for the more isolated farms;
  • More flexibility generally is required with respect to considering diversification proposals, particularly in terms of what may be considered appropriate uses (the need to produce farm plans/business plans to help justify proposals was highlighted);
  • More flexibility is required to allow replacement and new development as part of farm diversification e.g. holiday accommodation (although there was some debate as to whether there was a viable demand for holiday accommodation);
  • The lack of affordable rural housing and difficulties for young people/farm workers in finding suitable accommodation. More flexibility may be required in the approach to affordable housing provision, with an element of market housing being permitted;
  • The lack of flexibility with respect to the control and size of farm workers’ houses;
  • Equestrian uses are often contentious but offer diversification opportunities.

Options considered

10.47 The tudy saw little merit in permitting further employment use in isolated farm buildings when there is a surplus of industrial stock in the district.  It was considered undesirable that there is any further significant increase in the provision of employment land in unsustainable, rural locations.

10.48 Options were considered as to whether to radically change the policy approach to restrict conversions or to strengthen existing policy.

Town Centres, Retail and Leisure

10.49 The district has two main centres, Alton and Petersfield, and a number of smaller centres at, Whitehill/Bordon, Liphook, Grayshott, Horndean, Clanfield, Liss and Four Marks.

10.50 These centres have different roles depending on their size, but they all play an important part in the life of their communities.

10.51 The challenge will be to protect and enhance these centres, many of which have a historic core, in a changing retail and leisure market.

CP33 PREFERRED TOWN CENTRES, RETAIL AND LEISURE POLICY

Maintain and improve the vitality and viability of the District’s centres by setting out a strategy for the pattern and hierarchy of centres, including the role of different centres:

  • Town centres – Alton and Petersfield

    Alton and Petersfield should retain their current roles as Town Centres and should be maintained and enhanced. They are, and should continue to function as, the main comparison shopping centres and main destination for leisure, entertainment and cultural activities. They should act as principal centres in the District, where large scale development should be concentrated.

  • District centre – Liphook

    Liphook should be designated as a District Centre. It should complement town centres by providing for main and bulk convenience food shopping and a reasonable range of comparison shopping and other services. Its role should be maintained to ensure it provides an appropriate range of facilities and services.

  • Local centres - Clanfield, Four Marks, Grayshott, Horndean and Liss

    The Local Centres at Clanfield, Four Marks, Grayshott, Horndean and Liss should be maintained to ensure they provide basic food and grocery shopping, supported by a limited choice and range of comparison shops selling lower order comparison goods and a range of non-retail services and community uses. Opportunities for small scale (infill) development to provide additional shop premises may be appropriate.

  • Other small shopping facilities

    Local parades and small local centres should continue to be maintained and protected, to ensure all residents have access to a basic range of small shops and services. Core facilities should include convenience stores, post office, newsagent and pharmacy.

10.52 Note: the future status of the Forest Centre and High Street/Chalet Hill, Whitehill/Bordon will be dependant on the preferred option chosen for the Whitehill/Bordon Opportunity. A new town centre will be provided as part of the overall masterplan for Whitehill/Bordon.

Policy conformity

PPGs/PPSs/Circulars PPS1, PPS6
Draft South East Plan Policies TC1, TC2, TC3, TC4
Sustainable Community Strategy The local economy.
Priority Outcomes:
3. Build high quality successful communities for the benefit of businesses, residents, workers and visitors in:
  1. Small rural towns, ie Petersfield, Alton and Horndean.
  2. Smaller villages - increase support for rural village businesses and community services to stem their decline.
Core Strategy Objective To ensure that communities are happy with their town and village centres.
Policy Indicator Core Indicator BD4 Total amount of floorspace for ‘town centre use’
Local Indicator: amount of completed retail, office and leisure development.
Local Indicator: percentage of completed retail, office and leisure development in town centres
Local Indicator; Vacant shop premises.
Delivery Bodies EHDC, development industry, business and retailing organisations.

10.53 The district’s centres are an important focus for residents and visitors alike. They provide not only shopping facilities but many other services, such as finance, leisure, community and business support.

Strategy for centres

10.54 The Council’s retail study identifies the need to set out a strategy for the centres and how the role of these different towns and villages will contribute to the overall vision for the area.

10.55 The hierarchy of centres set out in PPS6 has the following categories:

  • City centres – highest level in the hierarchy, often a regional centre serving a wide catchment
  • Town centres – in many cases the principal centre or centres in a local authority’s area. In rural areas they are likely to be market towns which function as important service centres, providing a range of facilities and services for extensive rural catchment areas.
  • District centres – usually comprise groups of shops often containing at least one supermarket or superstore, and a range of non-retail services
  • Local centres – include a range of small shops of a local nature, serving a small catchment. In rural areas, large villages may perform the role of a local centre.

10.56 The role of the various centres in the district hierarchy was identified in the study. These continue as in the existing Local Plan other than it was recommended that Liphook local centre should be re-designated as a district centre.

10.57 The Forest Centre, Whitehill/Bordon was designated as a district centre and High Street/Chalet Hill, Whitehill/Bordon as a local centre. The status of these centres will depend on the preferred option chosen for the Whitehill/Bordon Opportunity and they have not, therefore, been included in the preferred policy at this stage .

10.58 The role of the centres and recommendations on their positions in the hierarchy are included in the preferred policy above. More detailed matters concerning individual centres, including the provision of additional retail floorspace, is set out in the spatial strategy and settlements sections.

The Core Strategy Issues and Options consultation revealed:

10.59 Meetings with the business community identified the provision of infrastructure and other facilities to support commerce in the district as an important requirement.

10.60 The community forum for the central area identified the loss of shops and number of vacant shops in Liss as giving particular concern for the future of this centre. The forum for the south area identified the lack of retail and commercial leisure facilities as of concern for Horndean. The Core Strategy Issues and Options consultation questionnaire revealed that the factors considered by the respondents as most important in improving their local centres were:

  • To protect shops from changing to other uses
  • To provide more shops
  • To improve the environment of the centre
  • To improve access by bus/cycle/walking

Options considered

10.61 Town centres, according to national and regional guidance, are the preferred location for shops and leisure development and the vitality and viability of these centres should be maintained. Options are therefore limited by policy guidance.

10.62 The district’s centres are in competition with neighbouring higher order centres such as Portsmouth, Winchester, Basingstoke, Farnham and Guildford. These centres house the bigger stores so the option exists to try and draw back significant levels of trade. This, supported by evidence from the retail study, was not considered to be a viable option.

Tourism

10.63 It is estimated that tourism in the district has a turnover of £150 million a year making it an important part of the local economy. The designation of part of the district as a national park is likely to make East Hampshire even more popular as a tourism destination.

10.64 The challenge will be to maintain and enhance the role of tourism in the district, whilst managing its impact in a sustainable manner.

CP34 PREFERRED TOURISM POLICY

The Council’s preferred approach to tourism facilities is to ensure:

  • the retention and improvement of existing tourism facilities, including visitor accommodation; and
  • that the provision of new facilities is focussed on the main settlements.
Policy conformity
PPGs/PPSs/Circulars PPS1, PPS6, PPS7, Good Practice Guidance on Planning for Tourism.
Draft South East Plan Policies TRS2, TRS4 -6
Sustainable Community Strategy The local economy.
Priority Outcomes:
3. Build high quality successful communities for the benefit of businesses, residents, workers and visitors in:
  1. Small rural towns, ie Petersfield, Alton and Horndean.
  2. Smaller villages - increase support for rural village businesses and community services to stem their decline.
Core Strategy Objective To maximise the value of tourism whilst managing tourist numbers.
Delivery Bodies EHDC, development industry

10.65 East Hampshire is an attractive place for visitors with beautiful countryside, attractive market towns and villages and a number of facilities aimed at tourists. With the designation of part of the district as a national park, more visitors may come to the area.

10.66 Tourism is an important part of the local economy. As well as spending money at tourist attractions and on accommodation, visitors use other businesses such as shops, restaurants and pubs as well. The provision of the appropriate facilities, which are targeted at visitors, will benefit not only them but residents alike.

10.67 But it is also important to realise that too many visitors may change the character of the area. Too many tourists could lead to overcrowding in some popular locations, more traffic and a degrading of the landscape.

10.68 The principle aim for tourism in East Hampshire is to develop, protect and enhance the area’s present assets, rather than introduce major new activities or the large-scale expansion of existing facilities.

10.69 The location of tourism facilities should be on the most sustainable sites. These are identified in the spatial strategy as the main towns.

10.70 In the countryside any tourism development should be small scale and reflect the sensitivity of the location.

The Core Strategy issues and Options consultation revealed:

10.71 Meetings with the business community identified the need for a strategy to tackle poor investment in the tourism industry in the district. The provision of infrastructure and other facilities to support business involved in tourism was also identified as an important requirement.

10.72 The steering group of the East Hampshire Tourism and Marketing Partnership agreed with the need to conserve and preserve the character of the district, particularly the countryside and the historic town centres. They identified a shortage of visitor accommodation and also raised the issue of quality of visitor accommodation. There are already limits on visitor capacity, for example car parking. Some of these issues will become even more pressing with the creation of the national park.

10.73 The Core Strategy Issues and Options consultation questionnaire revealed that the majority of respondents, 80%, agree that tourism should be encouraged. Respondents’ suggestions as to what they think would improve the tourism sector included:

  • Improve tourist information
  • Provide more, and range of, visitor accommodation, including rural barn conversions
  • Make the built environment more attractive
  • Improve visitor facilities and attractions

Options considered

10.74 Two options were considered. The first was to continue the low key approach to existing policy of encouraging expansion of existing facilities and allowing new facilities, chiefly in the main centres, where a case can be demonstrated. The second option was to promote tourism and tourism development and allow more and larger facilities. This was considered unsustainable and could have a detrimental impact on the district’s key assets, its countryside, landscape and historic character.

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